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Osip Aksenov
Osip Aksenov

Where Can I Buy Already Made Candy Apple



After tripping leaping over the practicality hurdle, we enjoyed slice after slice of the sweet and crunchy snack-on-a-stick. My sister, ever the attorney, suggested I include a legal disclaimer with this recipe stating that I am not responsible for any injuries and/or broken teeth caused by the candy apples.




where can i buy already made candy apple


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We make candy apple shopping for your events, business, or personnel enjoyment really easy. Our mini candy apples are made fresh to order and shipped to you for your enjoyment. View our 10 collections of apple types and our unlimited color options.


I would pour the left over on another sheet that is sprayed with cooking spray and let cool. That will make homemade hard candy. I always add candy flavoring to my recipe, so I will have a flavored hard candy to suck on later


Caramel apples have been one of my all time favorite things to make since I first started cooking and baking. But that made from scratch recipe takes some time and it can be intimating so this year I decided to share the easiest caramel apple recipe ever!


Today I'm sharing How to Make Candy Apples Any Color! This Candy Apple recipe is easy and makes sweet and crunchy candy apples. These are a traditional fall treat - perfect for your Fall Fest or Halloween party. You can make them in under 30 minutes with just a few basic pantry ingredients!


As I mentioned above, this is a from-scratch recipe. With the right ingredients, you can make these any color and flavor that you like. And unlike caramel apples, candy apples have a hard, crunchy candy coating similar to Life Savers!


My favorite part of these apples is that they're made with pantry staples and they can be ready in about 30 minutes. They're actually best served fresh, so this can be a "last-minute" treat and they'll be perfect!


You're also going to need some special supplies to make candy apples. One of the most important is a thermometer. You can use a simple candy thermometer (like this one) or if you want to upgrade, I highly recommend a Thermoworks thermometer. I have this one, but this Dot thermometer would also be great!


The first time I got an order for candy apples, my client requested that I do hot pink and bright orange. I didn't have any special flavors to add - so I just used some vanilla extract! Here's how they turned out:


Yes! You can exchange the vanilla for any flavoring oil you like... strawberry, cotton candy, bubble gum, watermelon, cinnamon (bet that would be good on an apple)... there are dozens of LorAnn flavors to choose from!


In my experience, candy apples are best if consumed in the first 12 hours. After that, the candy begins to get sticky and the apple begins to brown around the stick. So if you can't or won't be eating them immediately, I'd keep them at most for 3 days, at room temperature, in an airtight container.


And I've never had any luck refrigerating candy apples. They always get condensation on them and get sticky. For that reason, when ordered, I try to do them no more than 24 hours in advance and always store them at room temperature.


Do you need packaging supplies for candy or caramel apples? Check out this post! I personally like to wrap my candy apples in cellophane bags with a twist tie or ribbon OR put them in fancy boxes. I have all the details in this post.


It makes the candy opaque. Otherwise, it would be "clear" pink or "clear" orange and the green or red apple underneath would show through and the color wouldn't be true. Does that make sense? It would be like looking at a green apple through hot pink stained glass... no idea what color it would be but probably not a bright HOT pink!! ? Please let me know if that makes no sense and I'll try again ?


I couldn't find white food coloring in any store. So I made purple and they aren't opaque. Also I put in teaspoon of vanilla extract as recipe says and I can barely taste the vanilla. Would a tablespoon be enough do you think? By the way I mastered this recipe the very first time I tried it. The last apple was the hardest to get candy on. I was able to make 11 candied apples with this recipe using McIntosh apples.


Hi Rose,first let me say that your apples R BEAUTIFUL!!!!!! I made my first batch lasnight(usin this recipe) & the candy was a lil bitter tastin..is that normal from the food coloring? ....thanks in advance ?


Wow! I love candy apples! Carmel is ok..but I agree..candy all the way! ? I tried making them in the fall but not much success. I wasn't quick enough and the candy hardened before I was done. I will try it again though with this recipe!


Only candy melts will stick to a wet apple center. See this for why -question-c-11-34301I did get candy melts to work-- And I used kool aid packets for awesome flavors. Surprisingly Jello worked well with another candy apple recipe.


WOW!! totally awesome! My future D-I-L likes candy apples and i am doing all the pastry for her shower - pink velvet cake, pink cupcakes, pink-well you get the drift - and now I can add Pink candy apples!!!! thank you !!


Wow, Rose...the candy apples look fabulous. Great idea. You always come up with super fantastic cakes, cupcakes, cookies and now this. You can see the love you put into everything you do. You are so creative and by sharing your creations, you give us the opportunity to become super creative too. Thank you for sharing your works of art with us. I've followed you since the beginning of your baking blog and you've really grown as a professional.


Rose,These are beautiful! I never made candied apples and would not have thought to make them anything other than red! This is a great treat for the kids. Thanks for sharing at Tasty Creations. Have a great week.Michelle


Thank you so much Rose for sharing your recipe with everyone... I love making my candy apples from scratch but never knew how to give it that look without having to dip the apple in colored chocolate. I really appreciate your sharing!! God bless.


You absolutely could, but I wouldn't consider that a "traditional" candy apple. These have the same flavor, texture, hardness, etc. of the hard candy apples that are sold at fairs & carnivals but now they can be any color - not just red!


What I found that works the best after the candy is gone from the pot is put water in it right away and return to stove and boil the water, the left over sugar dissolves and you just wipe out the pot. Then dry it and reuse the same pot. Hope this helps and by the way those apples look DELICIOUS! !


These are so cute! I'm considering doing these for my son's 3rd birthday, but I wasn't sure if they were pre-schooler friendly. Do you think little kids would be safe eating the hard candy? Do you think I could cut the apple into circular slices (like cutting an onion for onion rings...not apple wedges if that makes any sense) to make it easier for them to get their little mouth's around?


I'm trying to leave my on comment, but I keep getting an error message, so I'm going to piggyback on Polly's comment. Sorry Polly!Great Recipe! Yesterday was my first time ever making candy apples and I made this recipe in neon green. They turned out beautiful! I only have two issues: the white specs from the bright white coloring and after they sit overnight, I had small holes in the dried shell. Is there anyway to get rid of the white specs, like maybe adding the bright white americolor into the mix a little earlier (in hope of the specs separating to form a even color as a end result. Finally, I'm not sure what to do about the holes. I am assuming they are air bubbles, but I'm baffled because they almost dry instantly and when I bagged them, they were hard. So, how did they get there? Thanks again for such a great recipe. I will definitely make these again!


Great Recipe! This was my first time ever making candy apples and II made this recipe yesterday in neon green. They turned out beautiful! I only have two issues: the white specs from the bright white coloring and after they sit overnight, I had small holes in the dried shell. Is there anyway to get rid of the white specs, like maybe adding the bright white americolor into the mix a little earlier (in hope of the specs separating to form a even color as a end result. Finally, I'm not sure what to do about the holes. I am assuming they are air bubbles, but I'm baffled because they almost dry instantly and when I bagged them, they were hard. So, how did they get there? Thanks again for such a great recipe. I will definitely make these again!


I had some at the end come out perfect and there was two factors so I'm not sure which one did it or if it was the mix of them but I noticed when I was dipping at the end the candy in the pot had cooled enough that it had no bubbles on top and the last few apples I used were very cold from the fridge.


Apples you buy at the store are usually gassed to maintain their color. The heat of your candy or caramel pulls the gas out - it gets trapped under the coating and leaves a bubble. If you submerge the apples in hot water for about 15 to 20 minutes the heat will help pull the gas out of the apple. Dry them off completely and then dip.


These are beautiful!! I have been looking for an idea to raise money, and I think this is perfect! Everyone loves candy apples, and they are only available here in October for a week when the fair comes. What do you think is a good price to sell them?


Hii made a trial run of toffee apples was hoping to use them for a 1 year old birthday party but they came out rock hard, I think too hard for the kids is there anything i could do to make them less hard or did i do something wrong as i did take longer than 20 minutes around 30 minutes to get to 302.thanks 041b061a72


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